P.S.
Present sighs. Past secrets. Post scripts.
P.S.
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mstrkrftz:

Three Brothers by Tim Gupta
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alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
alongwayforrice:

The adventures of Fluffy Goat in Xiahe, China.
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vacilandoelmundo:

Paris, France
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wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
wnycradiolab:

365 Petri Dishes by Klari Reis
(via Dark Silence in Suburbia)
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[“Just being on cliffs. Even if I’m on the inside of the mountain I still feel like, ‘what if I just wheel the car off the thing?’”] It’s the fear of jumping, isn’t it? It’s not the fear of the height, it’s the fear of jumping. I have exactly the same thing. I’m that close I could just jump. It’s the same next to train tracks and things. It’s like when you’re on stage in the middle of a play, and it’s a children’s play, and sometimes your head just goes, “I could just say FUCK right now really loudly.” It’s the same thing. I find it very interesting. It’s your brain playing little tricks with you. [“See? You’ve got a nice smile but there’s a black heart beating in your chest, Kit Harington.”] (x)

[“Just being on cliffs. Even if I’m on the inside of the mountain I still feel like, ‘what if I just wheel the car off the thing?’”] It’s the fear of jumping, isn’t it? It’s not the fear of the height, it’s the fear of jumping. I have exactly the same thing. I’m that close I could just jump. It’s the same next to train tracks and things. It’s like when you’re on stage in the middle of a play, and it’s a children’s play, and sometimes your head just goes, “I could just say FUCK right now really loudly.” It’s the same thing. I find it very interesting. It’s your brain playing little tricks with you. [“See? You’ve got a nice smile but there’s a black heart beating in your chest, Kit Harington.”] (x)

[“Just being on cliffs. Even if I’m on the inside of the mountain I still feel like, ‘what if I just wheel the car off the thing?’”] It’s the fear of jumping, isn’t it? It’s not the fear of the height, it’s the fear of jumping. I have exactly the same thing. I’m that close I could just jump. It’s the same next to train tracks and things. It’s like when you’re on stage in the middle of a play, and it’s a children’s play, and sometimes your head just goes, “I could just say FUCK right now really loudly.” It’s the same thing. I find it very interesting. It’s your brain playing little tricks with you. [“See? You’ve got a nice smile but there’s a black heart beating in your chest, Kit Harington.”] (x)

[“Just being on cliffs. Even if I’m on the inside of the mountain I still feel like, ‘what if I just wheel the car off the thing?’”] It’s the fear of jumping, isn’t it? It’s not the fear of the height, it’s the fear of jumping. I have exactly the same thing. I’m that close I could just jump. It’s the same next to train tracks and things. It’s like when you’re on stage in the middle of a play, and it’s a children’s play, and sometimes your head just goes, “I could just say FUCK right now really loudly.” It’s the same thing. I find it very interesting. It’s your brain playing little tricks with you. [“See? You’ve got a nice smile but there’s a black heart beating in your chest, Kit Harington.”] (x)
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curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
curatorialinc:

E.O. Hoppé was the “most famous photographer in the world in the 1920s.” Among his subjects were leading authors, celebrities, and people of all social stations, from royalty to commoners. One of his most explored subjects was the famous Ballet Russes, which Hoppé regularly photographed during their London seasons between 1911 and 1921. 
This world-renowned dance company challenged the traditional idea of ballets’ ‘feminine fragility’ by introducing modernism into this once sedate and highly mannered medium. Led by Sergei Diaghilev, the Ballet Russes truly embodied the concept of “Gesamtkunstwerk,” where every single aspect of the ballet—the costumes, set design, music, and choreography— were all integrated as a total work of art. Using such iconoclastic visual artists as Picasso, Matisse, Bakst and Benoit with discordant musical compositions from composers such as Stravinsky, and the dynamic and also shocking movements of their premiere dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, the Ballet Russes forced the entire art world into the Modern Era.
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powells:

Happy 196th birthday to Emily Brontë!